Princes William and Harry will 'stand shoulder to shoulder' at Philip's funeral

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Princes William and Harry will reunite as they walk behind their grandfather's coffin at his funeral next Saturday.

The brothers could stand shoulder to shoulder as they form part of the royal procession at the service for the Duke of Edinburgh next Saturday. 

It will be the first time the pair will be seen together since Harry's bombshell interview with Oprah Winfrey - in which he claimed his older brother was 'trapped' inside the Monarchy.  

However, the Duchess of Sussex, who is pregnant with the couple's second child, will not be attending following medical advice. 

Harry's attendance could be his chance to repair the 'deep damage' caused by his and Meghan's sit-down with Oprah, royal experts said today - as he spoke to senior members of the Royal Family ahead of his return to Britain.

A source told the Mail on Sunday that, while tensions have been 'high' following the fallout from the Oprah interview, the Royal Family are 'united in grief' following Prince Philip's death.

The Duke will be taken to St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle on a Land Rover he helped to design, and will be flanked by pall bearers from the Royal Marines, Regiments, Corps and Air Stations.

The decision to carry Philip in the custom-built car comes after he is said to have told the Queen: 'Just stick me in the back of a Land Rover and drive me to Windsor.'

Immediately behind the Land Rover, the Prince of Wales and other members of the family, likely to be the Duke's other children and some of his grandchildren including Harry and William, will proceed on foot.

Whether the unity will prove more than a public façade remains to be seen, but some royal sources hope that the brothers' first meeting for more than a year could lead to some kind of reconciliation. 

In other developments on the second day of national mourning since the Duke's death on Friday:

The Queen was said to bearing up well, with a tearful Countess of Wessex telling well-wishers that the Monarch 'has been amazing' after visiting her at Windsor with husband Prince Edward. Prince Andrew and Princess Anne also visited yesterday; A gun salute of 41 shots rang out from land and sea, home and abroad, in honour of the Duke, including the same gun in Woolwich Barracks, South-East London, that marked his wedding to the Queen in 1947; Church bells rang out 99 times in his memory; Two-minute silences were held at major sporting events including the Grand National at Aintree, where jockeys wore black armbands, and at football matches; The Duke of Cambridge withdrew from this weekend’s Bafta awards, where he had been due to deliver a speech virtually; Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer was accused of breaching protocol by rushing out his condolence message ahead of the Prime Minister; Monarchs, heads of state and prime ministers across the world sent heartfelt tributes, with US President Joe Biden hailing the Duke as a ‘heck of a guy’ and Pope Francis praising his 'devotion to his marriage and family'.

William and Harry together in 2017, at the European Premiere of Star Wars in London

Prince Harry, Prince Phillip and Prince William at the Rugby World Cup Final match between New Zealand and Australia at Twickenham Stadium in 2015

The Duke of Edinburgh, Prince William, Earl Spencer, Prince Harry and the Prince of Wales following the coffin of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997

Prince Harry will attend the funeral of his grandfather, Prince Philip, at St George's Chapel, Windsor, next Saturday, it has been confirmed. However, the Duchess of Sussex, who is pregnant with the couple's second child, will not be attending following medical advice. (Above, Philip with Harry and Meghan, William and Lady Louisa Windsor before a Christmas Day morning church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham in 2017) 

The Queen during a visit to the CWGC Air Forces Memorial in Runnymede, Surrey, to attend a service to mark the Centenary of the Royal Australian Air Force on March 31. This was her last public engagement 

In a post on their Archwell website, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said: 'Thank you for your services... you will be greatly missed'

Philip's funeral could help heal family tensions, say head of the Catholic church in England  

Coming together for the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral could help heal any tensions between the royal family and the Duke of Sussex, a religious leader has said.

Harry laid bare his rift with members of his family during an interview in the United States with Oprah Winfrey last month.

He is likely to fly in from his California home to attend his grandfather's funeral, but it is not known if he will be joined by the Duchess of Sussex as she is pregnant.

Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, said gathering for Philip's funeral could allow the family to have 'a comparative bit of privacy' together.

He told Times Radio: 'I think there might be a bit of consolation in it for the royal family actually because it just gives them a chance to be close and to have a comparative bit of privacy.

'Obviously the whole ceremony will be watched by everybody but you think of the complexities of the dynamics in that family and we have to think of Harry, so far away. I'm sure he'll come but not being, the whole time, in the public eye might just help.

'Many a family gather and get over tension and broken relationships at the time of a funeral. Something very profound unites them all again. And that would be true for this family, I'm sure.'

The Duke of Sussex will make the journey from the couple's home in California and will be following Covid-19 protocols for the trip, as well as during his visit. 

He is making arrangements for his first trip home since the pair quit royal life and moved out to the US.   

Harry has already spoken to family members including Prince Charles, Beatrice and Eugenie, according to The Mirror

A source said: 'He said he wants to be with everyone and was already making arrangements to come home.' 

William is said to have been angered by claims of racism in Harry and Meghan's interview with Oprah.

He is understood to be particularly hurt by Meghan's accusation that his wife Kate made her cry during a birdesmaid's dress fitting. 

Speaking of William's reunion with his brother, a source told the Mail on Sunday: 'All eyes will be on William and Harry at the funeral.

'This is the first time we're going to see them together since Harry and Meghan left for their new life in America. 

'There has been so much bad blood but everyone is hoping that, perhaps, this will mark the beginning of a reconciliation.'

The sourced added that, even though tensions have been 'high', the Royal Family are 'united in grief'.  

'Harry was told the news about his grandfather at the same time as other members of the family.' 

Prince Charles will walk alongside his sons as they follow the Land Rover on its journey to St George’s Chapel. 

The source added: 'They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Everyone will be watching the funeral closely to see the body language between the brothers.'

Five-bedroom Frogmore House, the Sussexes' UK residence, where Archie spent the first few months of his life, is currently on loan to Princess Eugenie, 31, and her husband Jack Brooksbank, so could be where Harry stays while attending the funeral.  

Penny Junor told MailOnline: 'My hope is that if something good can come out of the Duke's death it will be that it brings the family together. But clearly there is a lot of hurt there on all sides, and I imagine they will all be feeling apprehensive about seeing one another again. 

'With luck, their desire to support the Queen and pull together for her sake, which I am sure is what the Duke would have wanted, will win the day.' 

Meanwhile, Richard Fitzwilliams, said a 'show of unity' was vital for repairing relations after the 'very damaging' Oprah revelations, as he pointed to the strong relationship between Harry and his grandfather. 

'Harry will undoubtedly want to be there and this might start a process which helped to heal the current royal rift,' he said. 'His grandfather would undoubtedly welcome it if the monarchy, the institution he spent his life supporting, was strengthened as a result of the start of a reconciliation which began after his death.'

Their comments were echoed by Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, who said gathering for Philip's funeral could allow the family to have 'a comparative bit of privacy' together. 

Also today, Prince Charles paid tribute to his 'dear Papa' as he spoke for the first time following news of his father Prince Philip's death yesterday morning.

In a pre-recorded video message, the Prince of Wales said his father had given 'the most remarkable, devoted service' to 'The Queen, to my family and to the country', as well as the Commonwealth.

A specially modified Land Rover, Naval procession and royal mourning: Prince Philip's funeral details are released by palace 

2.40pm: Coffin emerges from State Entrance of Windsor Castle

The duke's coffin, accompanied by the Dean of Windsor and the Lord Chamberlain, will be moved to the State Entrance of Windsor Castle by a Bearer Party of The Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

The coffin will emerge and the Bearer Party will place it onto a specially modified Land Rover, which Philip helped to design, to transport it to St George's Chapel.

2.45pm: The procession leaves for St George's Chapel

The procession from the state entrance to the West Steps of the chapel will take eight minutes.

The Prince of Wales and members of the royal family will take part in the procession on foot, immediately behind the duke's coffin, together with staff from Philip's household.

The route of the procession will be lined by representatives drawn from the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Highlanders, 4th Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland and the Royal Air Force.

Minute guns will be fired by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery from the east lawn of Windsor Castle for the duration of the procession, and the Curfew Tower Bell will toll.

2.53pm: The Land Rover reaches the West Steps of the chapel

A Guard of Honour and Band from The Rifles will receive the coffin at the foot of the West Steps, with the national anthem being played as the coffin enters Horseshoe Cloister.

A bearing party of Royal Marines will carry the coffin up the steps and pause for the minute's silence.

3.00pm: National minute of silence

Following the minute's silence, the Dean of Windsor, together with the Archbishop of Canterbury, will receive the coffin at the top of the West Steps.

In keeping with coronavirus guidelines to limit guests inside the chapel, most of the procession will not enter the chapel, except for members of the royal family, and the duke's private secretary Archie Miller Bakewell.

The funeral service will begin as the coffin enters St George's Chapel.

The Duke of Edinburgh was, he said, a 'very special person' who would have been 'deeply touched' by the sorrow felt by millions of people in Britain and across the world at news of his passing.

He said he would miss his father 'enormously' and added that his family were 'deeply grateful' for the condolences offered, which he said would 'sustain us' at this 'particularly sad time'.

Prince Charles finished his message by simply saying: 'Thank you'.

Yesterday, Harry and Meghan paid a short tribute to Prince Philip following news of the Duke of Edinburgh's death.

In a post on their Archwell website, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex paid tribute to his grandfather with the two line message: 'Thank you for your services... You will be greatly missed.'  

Harry is likely to make the journey to London by private jet from his home near Los Angeles and it is understood he may be permitted to use a diplomatic exemption to waive the normal Covid quarantine rules applying to flights from the USA. 

It has been reported that Harry was already largely self-isolating at the £11m mansion near Santa Barbara from when his grandfather entered hospital. 

It is thought he will be tested for Covid-19 before departure from the US and upon arrival in the UK, instead of being subject to the normal 10-day quarantine, though travellers are allowed to leave quarantine if they test negative after five days.

It is not known where he will stay during his stay in the UK, nor for how long he will remain after the funeral.

The reunion of the Duke of Sussex with his brother William and father Prince Charles will be awkward enough following his and Meghan's shocking accusations of racism in the TV show aired only last month.

Despite the obvious rift, the Queen will expect her grandsons to put on a united front, along with the rest of the Royals as a mark of respect for the late Duke of Edinburgh.  

While Harry claimed in the interview to have always had a good relationship with the Queen, it's unclear what kind of relationship, if any, he now has with Prince William and his father, Prince Charles.

According to CBS host Gayle King, a close friend of Oprah, Prince William, 38, reached out to Prince Harry after the explosive interview, but talks were 'not productive'.

Harry's claims that William was 'trapped' inside the monarchy are believed to have caused deep offence. Some royal experts believe that William is willing to give his brother a final chance.

The pair would almost certainly have met anyway on July 1 for the unveiling of a statue of Diana in London, but there was always a question mark over that reunion because of Meghan's imminent due date, which has not been publically confirmed.

It is not clear if Harry had planned to return in June, when Prince Philip would have turned 100, and when a Trooping of the Colour was planned.

Prince Philip's death comes just a month after Harry and Meghan gave an interview to Oprah in which they alleged racism in the Royal Family. It aired when Philip was in the hospital 

Harry was last pictured with Philip on May 8, 2019, when they were seen posing for a charming photograph with Baby Archie at Buckingham Palace

PREGNANT MEGHAN WILL NOT ATTEND FUNERAL

The pregnant Duchess of Sussex will not be attending the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral after medical advice.

The Duke of Sussex will make the journey from the couple's home in California and will be following Covid-19 protocols for the trip, as well as during his visit.

It is understood that Meghan, who is pregnant with her second child, had made every effort to join her husband but was not given clearance to travel by her doctor. 

Harry has not returned to the UK since stepping down as a senior royal just over a year ago.

It also be the first time he has seen his family in person since his and Meghan's bombshell interview with Oprah Winfrey - in which they accused the royal family of racism and the institution failing to support a suicidal Meghan. 

The Duke of Cambridge, in a rare move on a royal engagement, spoke out publicly saying 'We're very much not a racist family', as the royals' ability to carry out official duties linked to diversity, inclusion and mental health was called into question.

Harry told Oprah Winfrey that he felt let down by his father the Prince of Wales and that 'there's a lot of hurt that's happened' between them, and that his relationship with his brother William was 'space' but he loved him to bits. 

Now events have forced William and Harry to meet sooner than expected, and other members of the Royal Family will be hoping that a healing of the brothers' rift will be a silver lining in the cloud of Prince Philip's passing.

The Sussexes, who ignored calls to postpone the March 7 CBS interview because Philip was unwell, accused an unnamed royal, not the Queen nor the duke, of raising concerns about how dark their son Archie's skin tone would be before he was born.

Ms King claimed afterwards that the pair had a contingency plan that if Prince Philip's condition worsened, the interview would not have aired. That has not been confirmed by TV networks.

The interview was sold by CBS to dozens of countries around the world, and CBS paid a reported $8million for it.

Meghan also claimed that she'd been trapped by the 'institution' and was at one point suicidal, but that when she sought help, was told she could not have it.

Meghan is now pregnant with their second child and due to give birth sometime in the summer but she has not disclosed exactly when. The couple has not commented on any plan to return to the UK.

The Queen said after the interview that the allegations were 'concerning' but that 'some recollections may vary' and the matter was a family one that would be dealt with privately. 

The Sussexes, who faced calls to postpone the interview because Philip was unwell, accused an unnamed royal, not the Queen nor the duke, of raising concerns about how dark their son Archie's skin tone would be before he was born. 

Since then, they have launched a charity, accepted lucrative business deals with Netflix and Spotify, given public talks, appeared on Zoom conferences, and on March 7, they criticised the Royal Family in a sit-down interview with Oprah that was viewed around the world. 

Meghan is now pregnant with their second child and due to give birth sometime in the summer but she has not disclosed exactly when. 

According to government guidelines, people travelling to England must self-isolate from arrival into the country for 10 full days.  

Prince Harry was last pictured earlier this month throwing a tennis ball for his dog in Los Angeles

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were seen out and about on March 7 in their £170,000 Range Rover

However, arriving travellers can take a test five days after arriving in the country and - if this is negative - may leave self-isolation. 

This is the most likely option for Prince Harry unless he claims special status accorded to diplomats.    

Harry was last pictured with Philip on May 8, 2019, when they were seen posing for a charming photograph with baby Archie at Buckingham Palace.  

Since then they kept up over Zoom, with Harry telling James Corden: 'We've Zoomed them a few times, they've seen Archie running around. 

But my grandfather, instead of pressing 'leave meeting', he just goes 'doof' [mimics shutting the laptop]. I'm like, okay, bye…' Harry explained, laughing.

Meanwhile, Meghan spoke about Philip's illness on Oprah, saying: 'This morning, I woke up earlier than H, and saw a note from someone on our team in the UK saying that the Duke of Edinburgh had gone to the hospital. 

'But I just picked up the phone and I called the Queen just to check-in. That's what we do, being able to default to not having to every moment go, 'Is that appropriate?'' 

What kind of reception the Sussexes will receive if they return to the UK after their extraordinary interview and behaviour over the last year is uncertain. 

Buckingham Palace announced the death of Prince Philip at just after midday yesterday - and described the Queen's 'deep sorrow'

The Sussexes' Oprah interview has further strained their relationship with other members of the royal family, including the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (seen visiting Westminster Abbey on March 23) 

'He has been my strength and stay all these years': Queen's touching words about Prince Philip

The Queen has shared a touching tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh - a day after her husband of 73 years died at Windsor Castle at the age of 99.

A portrait, which shows Her Majesty, 94, sitting next to Prince Philip, was posted on the Royal Family's social media along with a moving quote from the monarch about her husband from a speech she made celebrating their golden wedding anniversary in 1997.

She said: 'He has, quite simply, been my strength and stay all these years, and I, and his whole family, and this and many other countries, owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim, or we shall ever know.'

The Queen was speaking in November 1997 during a lunch at Banqueting House in London, in which she looked back on 'a remarkable fifty years'.

Her Majesty announced her husband's death at midday on Friday as the Union Flag was lowered to half-mast outside Buckingham Palace.

The touching portrait and quote were shared to Instagram today, alongside the caption: 'At The Queen's Coronation in 1953, The Duke of Edinburgh swore to be Her Majesty's 'liege man of life and limb.'

'The Duke was a devoted consort (companion to the Sovereign) for almost 70 years, from Her Majesty's Accession in 1952 until his death.'

The image of the royal couple was first released as part of a series of photo portraits in 2016 to mark the Queen's 90th birthday, and was released the day before Philip's 95th birthday.

Taken at Windsor Castle after Easter that year, it was the sixth and final picture in a series of portraits taken by photographer Annie Leibovitz to mark the Queen's birthday.

CBS host Gayle King, who is a close friend of Oprah, claimed afterwards that the pair had a contingency plan that if Prince Philip's condition worsened, the interview would not have aired. It has not been confirmed by TV networks that that is the case.

The interview was sold by CBS to dozens of countries around the world, and CBS paid a reported $8million(£5.8m) for it. 

The Queen said after the interview that the allegations were 'concerning' and that she would address them within Buckingham Palace.  

While Harry claimed in the interview to have always had a good relationship with the Queen, it's unclear what kind of relationship, if any, he now has with Prince William and his father, Prince Charles. 

Meghan claimed during the interview that contrary to public reports based on palace sources, she did not make Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, cry during the run-up to her wedding and that it was Kate who made her cry instead. 

She also claimed that she'd been trapped by the 'institution' and was at one point suicidal but that when she sought mental health help, she was told she could not have it. 

The Royal Family has not commented on those claims. 

The Duke of Edinburgh spent his final days at Windsor Castle with his wife, who he lovingly called Lilibet throughout their long life together, after a 28-night stay in hospital having been admitted in mid-February for an infection and a pre-existing heart condition.

Her Majesty announced her husband's death at midday as the Union Flag was lowered to half-mast outside Buckingham Palace and on public buildings across the UK and Commonwealth, while members of the public hugged and wiped away tears as they laid flowers in his memory - and messages of love and support for the Queen and her family.

The Royal Family said in a statement: 'It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen announces the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle. Further announcements will made in due course. The Royal Family join with people around the world in mourning his loss'.

Her Majesty, who remains at Windsor Castle, is now expected to enter an eight-day period of mourning. She will not carry out any duties, even in private, while laws will not be given the Royal Assent and affairs of state will also be paused.

As with all royal births, marriages and deaths, a notice announcing Philip's passing was displayed outside Buckingham Palace. Mourners are already laying flowers at the palace, Sandringham, Balmoral and Windsor Castle, where he is expected to be buried in Frogmore Gardens following a small family service at St George's Chapel. 

A frail Philip was last seen leaving hospital on March 16 and his death plunges the nation and the Royal Family into mourning, and brings to an end Philip's lifetime of service to Britain and to Elizabeth, the Queen who adored him since her teens. The couple shared their 73rd wedding anniversary last November and he was due to turn 100 on June 10 this year. 

The Union Flag was lowered to half mast at Buckingham Palace this afternoon just after it was revealed that Prince Philip has passed away shortly before his 100th birthday

Boris Johnson led the tributes and addressed the nation outside No 10 Downing Street shortly after the announcement. He said: 'We give thanks, as a nation and a kingdom, for the extraordinary life and work of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh'.

He added: 'Speaking on their golden wedding anniversary, Her Majesty said that our country owed her husband 'a greater debt than he would ever claim or we shall ever know' and I am sure that estimate is correct So we mourn today with Her Majesty The Queen.

'We remember the duke for all of this and above all for his steadfast support for Her Majesty the Queen. Not just as her consort, by her side every day of her reign, but as her husband, her 'strength and stay', of more than 70 years.

'And it is to Her Majesty, and her family, that our nation's thoughts must turn today. Because they have lost not just a much-loved and highly respected public figure, but a devoted husband and a proud and loving father, grandfather and, in recent years, great-grandfather.' 

Mr Johnson also praised his Duke of Edinburgh scheme, which has 'shaped and inspired the lives of countless young people'. 

'I will miss my dear papa': Prince Charles pays tribute to his 'very special' father as he praises him for his 'devoted service to Queen and country' and says that the royal family are 'deeply grateful' for moving tributes 

Prince Charles today paid tribute to his 'dear Papa' as he spoke for the first time following news of his father Prince Philip's death yesterday morning.

In a pre-recorded video message, the Prince of Wales said his father had given 'the most remarkable, devoted service' to 'The Queen, to my family and to the country', as well as the Commonwealth. 

The Duke of Edinburgh was, he said, a 'very special person' who would have been 'deeply touched' by the sorrow felt by millions of people in Britain and across the world at news of his passing. 

He said he would miss his father 'enormously' and added that his family were 'deeply grateful' for the condolences offered, which he said would 'sustain us' at this 'particularly sad time'.   

Speaking from his Gloucestershire home, Highgrove, Charles said: 'I particularly wanted to say that my father, for I suppose the last 70 years, has given the most remarkable, devoted service to The Queen, to my family and to the country, but also to the whole of the Commonwealth.

'As you can imagine, my family and I miss my father enormously. He was a much loved and appreciated figure and apart from anything else, I can imagine, he would be so deeply touched by the number of other people here and elsewhere around the world and the Commonwealth, who also I think, share our loss and our sorrow.

'My dear Papa was a very special person who I think above all else would have been amazed by the reaction and the touching things that have been said about him and from that point of view we are, my family, deeply grateful for all that.

'It will sustain us in this particular loss and at this particularly sad time. Thank you.'

Your guide to Prince Philip's funeral service that he tailor made for himself: Duke of Edinburgh's body will be borne by a Land Rover and taken to the steps of St George's Chapel

Borne by a Land Rover and in the presence of his family and representatives of the military establishment that was so close to his heart, Philip's body will be taken to the steps of St George's Chapel, Windsor. 

Based on details released by Buckingham Palace yesterday, this is how his funeral service will then take place next Saturday afternoon.

Based on details released by Buckingham Palace yesterday, this is how his funeral service will then take place next Saturday afternoon

Details about the order of service have not been released but the Mail on Sunday has compiled this based on the one used for the Queen Mother 

1 The coffin, covered with Philip's personal standard and a wreath of flowers, is borne by 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards from Windsor Castle's private chapel.

2 2.40pm. It reaches the castle state entrance. Accompanying the coffin will be the Dean of Windsor and the Lord Chamberlain. Those gathered in the quadrangle 'pay compliments'.

Royal Marines place the coffin on a Land Rover.

The procession sets off, led by Band of the Grenadier Guards, followed by the Major General's Party and the Service Chiefs.

3 The route is lined by representatives of the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Highlanders, 4th Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland and the RAF. Minute guns are fired by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery from the East Lawn. The Curfew Tower bell tolls.

4 2.53pm. The procession reaches St George's Chapel West Steps. A Guard of Honour and Band from The Rifles receives the coffin at the foot of the steps. The National Anthem is played as the coffin enters Horseshoe Cloister. A bearing party of Royal Marines carries the coffin up the steps.

3pm. Pause for a minute's silence. The Archbishop of Canterbury and Dean of Windsor receive the coffin. Only members of the Royal Family and Philip's private secretary, Archie Miller-Bakewell, enter the chapel. 

The Service begins with the coffin carried to the catafalque in the Quire.

Left, Philip's body is believed to have been moved here, to the Albert Memorial Chapel. Right, the King George VI Memorial Chapel - It is widely believed the Queen wishes to be buried alongside Philip here

Albert Memorial Chapel 

Philip's body is believed to have been moved here. The chapel was created by Queen Victoria in honour of her husband, Albert, in 1875.

Portraits of the couple's nine children were included among decorations of gilding, marble, mosaics, precious stones and coloured glass.

King George VI Memorial Chapel 

It is widely believed the Queen wishes to be buried alongside Philip here. The bodies of her parents, George VI and the Queen Mother, as well as the ashes of her sister, Princess Margaret, are interred here.

His personal standard

Prince Philip's Standard knits together his rich lineage and personal history. The flag is quartered into Denmark, Greece, Mountbatten and Edinburgh

Prince Philip's Standard knits together his rich lineage and personal history. The flag is quartered into Denmark, Greece, Mountbatten and Edinburgh – representing the two royal families he descends from, as well as his surname and title.

Born into the Greek and Danish royal families, he renounced his right to either throne when he became a British subject before his marriage to Princess Elizabeth at Westminster Abbey in 1947. 

Denmark is represented on the standard by three blue lions passant and nine red hearts on a yellow field, while Greece consists of a white cross on a blue field. 

Before his wedding, he adopted his mother's surname of Mountbatten, represented by five vertical stripes. After his marriage, he was designated a Royal highness and became the Duke of Edinburgh. The city is represented by a three-towered castle.

Buried in his Naval finery 

Philip (pictured left on his honeymoon in Malta in 1947 and right at Sandhurst in 2006), is expected to be buried in his ceremonial naval uniform.

Philip is expected to be buried in his ceremonial naval uniform. 

Traditionally, this includes a ceremonial day coat with aiguillettes – long strands of weaved gilt thread – worn on the right shoulder, the Royal Cypher and Sleeve Lace Distinction Marks of Rank consisting of rows of gold lace with a circle (or 'curl'); gold-laced trousers; white, long-sleeved shirt; black socks; black shoes; white gloves.

His coffin will be draped with his personal standard, and decorated with a wreath of flowers and his naval cap and sword.

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